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him. >> on c-span2 and c-span 3. >> next, a discussion about journalism in china and censorship by the country's government. topics include the blind chinese dissident that arrived in china last week. this is about an hour. >> why don't you tell us your experience, since you have spent a lot of time in china. >> it has been in some ways as difficult as ever. it is hard to get a general piece. you have to get accedidation, you have to do interviews. i don't have that. a lot of people don't. even though there are not possibly as pervasive or social opposition to controversial journalism. i would say that because there is not so much freedom of speech . it is just a critical -- natural curiosity is not welcome in china. >> cultural or political? >> questions about politics. generations are not comfortable talking about politics in restaurants. i think that the internet has done a lot. >> you have been around a few times. have you really watched the broad sweep over this as a journalist and editor. how do you analyze the courses improving and maybe the courses that are retro grade?
, america's attitude towards china. not so much what china is doing, but what we are doing intellectually in our spiritual approach to china -- whether we are building it into something it is not, whether we are establishing in our own minds a solid path to the future, or whether we are doing something else. our guest for this discussion, this exploration is amitai etzioni, a very distinguished professor of sociology who teaches now at the george washington university, but who used to be a professor at columbia and at harvard and who is educated at berkeley in california. you will find him fascinating. he is one of the most intriguing and gifted men that i have had the pleasure of knowing in my life. after the announcements and after a message from our sponsor, the exelon company of chicago, you will meet this great man, amitai etzioni. >> many have spoken out on the need to transition to a clean energy future. at exelon, we are acting. by 2020, we are committed to reducing, offsetting, or displacing more than 15 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions annually through greening ou
the discussion on media discussion of china. and then a booking forum of america's role in the world. >> welcome to wichita, kansas. yee-ha. >> the mayor will talk about the problem we will have on taxic s taxicabs. >> june 2 and 3, book tv and history tv will cover local content vehicles. >> this was done in 1831, i believe this was issued for members immediate use only. not that they had xerox machines but they were not to loan this out. because as you can see, it told where everyone lived. >> watch wichita on june 2 and 3. >> now media coverage of china. this is hosted by the ashia society in new york city. and they discuss a blind disiddent that arrived in new york last weekend. this is just under an hour. >> the title of this is mystery mayhem, this is one topic that never goes away. why don't you tell us about the changes you have seen in the time you have spent in china, in particular covering china. in terms of the media ability to cover that country. >> continue that question. >> you know it's still in some ways as difficult as ever. there are so many things, the most obvious is legal
. >> china is a and your mind, or more especially american attitudes to china, which are very confused. we by an enormous amount of goods. i could hardly close myself without some kind of chinese government is not the entire ensemble, and we borrow all of our money from china, yet it seems to be an enemy, and there will be a confrontation one day, east and west will meet in the personages of the united states and china. >> i hope some people that listen to wes will join us. -- that listen to us will join us. as young people say, let's cool it. >> i say cool it. does that make me young? >> offensively. i guarantee it in writing. all natives, to be fair, have a tendency to divide us against them. it is easy to blame the outsider for problems rather than admitting difficulties and failures. from the get-go it is tempting to make and the series -- adversaries. it is quick to get on the escalator, and we have been there, declaring nations as a threat. japan for a while was greatly feared, and i am not talking about just world war ii, but in recent years with economic success that is similar to
't look like soft power when you're in china watching. >> do you think within china that the media has had a salutary effect on the way people view the world or are things up and down and just sort of unpredictable? are we making progress in the sense of the great promise of media to inform? >> within china? >> yeah. i mean, we could ask the question about america as well. and i'd hate to think of the answer. >> i don't think i know the answer to the question about china. >> what about america, marcus? >> wait, let's hear the answer about china. >> all right. but don't forget the answer on america. >> you mean is the foreign media making a big impact on -- >> no. is the evolution of the media to be more open, providing more information, has it actually had a good effect in sort of enlightening society and opening society? >> definitely. i would say that what's gone far and beyond the evolution of the media -- you know, the newspapers and magazines in china is the internet, though. because it's just a platform for civil society that hasn't existed ever before. so -- and it's still very much
with china they'd understand it better and calm down and we'd have more understanding. i'm wondering, in your experiences with writers, yourselves, friends, colleagues, who have done a lot of time in china, do people come out of that experience feeling -- what do they come out of it feeling? that's really the question. i don't want to prejudice the answer. but what does the experience leave people who spend a lot of time covering china with, about the country? >> i think a lot of people go to china fresh and -- i mean, they still may be very excited by china, but they become pretty embitered by the way they're treated as foreign correspondents. you know, it's very difficult. and they become -- not that they were necessarily so friendly to the chinese government when they came, but i think they become pretty clear-eyed about its deficiencies. i don't flow. it's -- >> i think clear-eyed but not butter. i think a lot of people who go to china are quite fascinated by china. it's a compelling, important story. for most of us the best story, best journalism we ever did. and if you look around the m
>> today on "christian world news" a tense standoff in china. a christian activist seeks help from the u.s. how would that impact relations between our two countries? tremendous revival in the country side, cbn news has the exclusive video from inside china. we'll take you there and see the powerful move of god. plus one nation under god, christians across this country gathered for the 61st annual day of prayer. we go to our nation's capitol where folks join together to mark the historic events. one man's daring escape puts two great nations to the test. hello everyone i am george thomas. china and united states in a diplomatic war. a blind chinese activist is asking the united states to ask him get safely out of china. the controversy disrupted a china summit in beijing. efrem graham reports. >> now they are trying to find a solution, the blind chinese activist pleads for more help from washington. clinton spoke around the issue urging china to improve its human right effort. >> we believe all governments have to answer to citizens aspirations for dignity and rule of law. and no n
. thank you very much. >>> now a discussion of how the media covers china. from the asia society in new york, this about an hour. >> so the title of this august assembly is, mystery, mayhem and the media, the challenges of covering china. this is one topic that never seems to go away. maybe, april, since you have just won this nice award, why don't you tell us what kinds of changes you've seen in the time that you've spent in china, particularly covering china. i mean, in terms of the media's ability to cover that country. >> just a teeny little question. >> a teeny little question. it's -- you know, it's still in some ways as difficult as ever. there's so many -- there's so many challenges. of course the most obvious being legal issues. it's hard to get a visa. you have to get accreditation, you have to submit an application in order to do interviews legally. and i don't have that. a lot of people don't. but there's a -- but beyond that, there's even more -- possibly even more pervasive a challenge is just a sort of social opposition to controversial journalism. a lot of -- a lot of --
their names be used. one of our reporters right now in china, keith richberg, has one of his assistants basically spending full-time on the equivalent of twitter, monitoring social discourse april was talking about. information is abundant. and that's on this sort of political/social level. on the business or economic front, when i first moved to hong kong in 1984, there were these jesuits in hong kong. lazil ladoni. they'd been evicted from the communists in 1949 and had gone to hong kong, set up camp there, and they were reporting on china, trying to get the facts right out of china. in the late '70s, they'd go to the kowloon railroad station, look at the grease on the axles of the trains, try to figure out the state of the petrochemical industry in china or something. that contrasts quite -- it's a huge contrast today with what norm's company, bloomberg, does. they probably have people dedicated to covering the state of the petrochemical industry in china today. there's vastly more information, the society is vastly more open, reporters have way more access. that's not in any way to
>>> further intimidation. china expels an al jazeera journalist as it tries to pressure the media before its once in a decade change in leadership. welcome to nhk world "newsline." china refused to renew a visa for al jazeera's beijing correspondent who has now been forced to leave the country. nhk world has more from beijing. >> reporter: the qatar-based satellite broadcaster said chinese authorities refused to renew melissa chan's visa. al jazeera says it's closed its chinese bureau for its english language channel because authorities also refused to issue a visa for her replacement. chan is a u.s. citizen and had been reporting from china for al jazeera's english channel since 2007. she has covered social problems including what goes on at facilities that temporarily detain people who try to lodge petitions with the government. the foreign correspondents club of china has denounced the incident. it says that this is the most extreme example of a recent pattern of china's government using visas to censor and intimidate journalists from abroad. in 1998, china expelled a japanese
with the china executive commission. they're going to gavel in here momentarily following up on the case of the blind chinese civil rights activist chen guangcheng who is imprisoned by the chinese government. fled to the embassy in beijing and is now awaiting paperwork before he travels to the u.s. live coverage here on c-span3. >>> committee will come to order. i want to thank all of you for joining us for this hearing to examine the status of chinese human rights offender chen guangcheng and that of his family on the those who have been targeted in connection with this case. this hearing will also focus on chen's cause. chen guangcheng is among the bravest defenders of women's rights in the world. chen defended thousands of women from the ongoing most egregious state spon spored exploitation and abuse of women in human history. pervasive forced abortion and involuntary sterilization as part of china's one child per couple policy. and has suffered as a result of his defense cruel torture, degrading treatment, unjust incarceration, and multiple beatings. the sheer magnitude of this explo
weiner, malia cohen who just came from china lot -- not long ago from a trip. thank you for being here. to our family associations, our department heads, our other commissioners and friends, happy new year, and welcome to our official celebration here at city hall of our wonderful chinese lunar new year. we just came from the official lighting of our new lantern. i hope you will stay tonight long enough to view all of its beauty and the lightness of it. there are a lead the lights on there. there are recycle cd's on the dragon boat. it is 76 feet long. it is, of course, my entry into the america's cup. anyway, i want to thank everyone for being here, for helping us celebrate. as we have been saying, this is one of the most exciting, attractive holiday seasons for the whole of san francisco and all of our communities. we look forward, and i hope you join me, in not only the very big chinese new year's parade of will happen this saturday, but the whole weekend. there are community affairs. there is the coronation ball. we just finished the street for a couple of weeks ago. the pageant ju
. when i travel to china with congressman smith in 2008, before the beijing olympics, every single one of the dissidents lawyers that we would've dinner with one night were either detained or warned not to attempt with one exception, that person who made it was subsequently placed under house arrest. china presently spends more on public security in an attempt to control its population than it does on its own defense. our own state department human rights report, china is an authoritarian state, end of quote with the government continues to muzzle freedom of speech and press and rein in civil society. this paper, the chinese government went to a farm to deny a visa to a citizen, the u.s. ambassador for international freedom. the very time the vice president of china was meeting with the president of the united states, president obama, the president ambassador for human rights and religious freedom, susan, couldn't even get a visa to go to china. of course, china is a barbaric practical, force abortion and sterilization. the list goes on. in short, chance? is not an anomaly but systemat
kobayashi. the united states is renegotiating with c china over the fate of the chinese human rights activist chen quangcheng, who was transferred to a beijing hospital from the u.s. embassy there wednesday. the u.s. government announced chen would be moved to a safe location within the country reflecting his choice. the move was based on an agreement with china. on thursday, chen revealed his concerns to nhk in a telephone interview. >> he also said chinese authoritiy ies have set up seve new surveillance cameras at his home where his mother still lives. chen says the reassurances he got before leaving the embassy have not been kept and his rights are being violated. u.s. state department spokesperson victoria nuland said chen had a change of mind after half a day in the hospital. she added the u.s. government is rethinking its agreement with china and negotiating the possibility of chen and his family abroad. chinese government is trying to avoid a lengthy dispute that could accelerate demands for democracy. >>> the united states and china ended their first day of strategic and eco
at the american embassy in beijing. he's only speaking with u.s./china relations and outlining how they could benefit if certain conditions were met. >> we also believe that that relationship will that much stronger and china will be that much more prosperous and strong as you see improvements on human rights issues in that country. >> obama says he's aware of the reports regarding chen, but he's refusing to make a statement on the issue. chen is blind. he's campaigned against forced abortions under china's one-child policy. activists say he fled his home and arrived in beijing four days later and seven-day outlook protection at the american embassy. u.s. assistant secretary of state arrived earlier than expected for talks between the two countries. he's discussing chen ace case with chinese authorities. >>> the u.s. and philippines are holding high level talks. they agreed to strengthen ties through joint military drills. there are territorial disputes in the south china sea. top foreign and defense officials from u.s. and philippines have their first ever meeting in washington on monday. u.
,000 are on the verge of failing. >>> china is now facing a range of serious environmental problems, and the world is watching to see how it's trying to tackle them. air and water pollution, desertification and global warming are all huge and complex issues. with china still enjoying robust economic growth, it's becoming increasingly important to encourage companies to adopt eco-friendly approaches. nhk world susumu koijima has more. >> reporter: last month, top business leaders and government gathered. the aim to encourage businesses to improve their environmental footprint. the meeting was organized by a non-profit group set up by influential entrepreneurs in china. the group focuses on about 1,000 companies that generate annual profits in china of over $160 million. it screens the environmental steps they are taking and awards prizes to 100 green companies that have the most outstanding records. >> there are chinese examples of companies who are, i think, doing extremely well, and they have dreams and visions for their companies. >> reporter: one of this year's winner was the beijing-based comp
." >> as the dispute over the dissident chen guangcheng continues, hillary clinton called on china to protect human rights. >> end of the road as newt gingrich abandoned his campaign to challenge president obama in november. a monk masterpiece -- a masterpiece that is a price in new york. >> it is 11:00 a.m. in singapore. >> it is 4:00 in the morning in london. broadcasting to viewers on pbs in america and around the world. >> u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has told china that it cannot deny the aspirations of its citizens. she opened high-level talks between the two countries in beijing. the run-up to the talks has been marked with the run-up regarding chen guangcheng, who has saw refuge at the u.s. embassy. >> the united states raises the importance of human rights and fundamental freedoms. we believe all governments do have to answer to citizens aspirations for dignity and the rule of law. no nation can or should deny those rights. as president obama said this week, a china that protect the rights of all the citizens will be a stronger and more prosperous nation. of course, a stronger p
last month. his presence in the embassy had overshadowed a visit to china by hillary clinton with chinese authorities accusing the u.s. of unacceptable interference in its internal affairs. our correspondent has details. >> this is one of the biggest hospitals in beijing. chinese security agents desperate to keep one of the bestknown human-rights activists hidden. at the end of the corridor in a wheelchair we have glimpsed him. his leg was injured, brought here by u.s. diplomats who negotiated a deal with china for him to get medical treatment and to study freely. his safety guaranteed. the silhouettes of his wife and children, long held captive by chinese security, reunited with him under the deal. >> she said she was [inaudible] >> the blind lawyer became an icon of human rights abuses after he exposed the way thousands of women had undergone forced abortion. for seven years, he was held here under illegal house arrest. he and his family beaten savagely, guarded around the clock. despite his lack of sight, he outwitted his guard. now china has been using his family for barg
for ivory. currently, china emerges as the leading driver of illegal trade in ivory. according to the kenya wildlife service, 90% of ivory seized at kenya's airports involved chinese nationals and since 2007, demand of illegal ivory seized in kenya has gone up by 800%. in hindsight, it looks as if the new spike in results poaching crisis was xexacerbated by the decision in 2008 to allow one off sail in china of illegal ivory. this seems to have stimulated demand as we predicted might be the case. it doesn't seem to be problematical now for chinese consumers to buy ivory if some of it is legal and some isn't. it creates confusion. i visited china in october. to learn how the chinese regarded their own elephants. the last of the wild chinese elephants still out in the forest. i learned that the chinese highly value their own wild elephants and they're strictly protected. if china would develop leadership role in africa as well as in their own country with a respect to elephants, much of the problem could be solved. if the buying stops, the killing can, too. it is a phrase borrowed from an ngo
to report that in china brothers and sisters are illegal and women are treated as criminals if they have a child without explicit government permission. and your story and i know she herself as suffered the great exploitation herself and tens of millions have sfrd this dough grading and this horrific abuse of women. again, that's what chen guancheng's cause was. for that he has been so brutally mistreated. i'd like to now turn to my distinguished colleague emory burkel, who is a registered nurse, a lawyer, a former assistant attorney general for the state of new york. he also chairs the subcommittee on health for the veterans affairs committee. bob will join us in a moment. we do have chen guancheng and then we'll go to emory. he joined us may 3rd and provided very useful insights to say the least. we'll yield to him momentarily so he can speak from his hospital bed again in china. emory, if you wanted to say a few words. >> thank you, mr. chairman. and i want to thank the chairman for his steadfast pursuit of human rights throughout the world. as you mentioned, 30 years he has been vigi
>>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." u.n. officials say some countries are using china as a gateway to send goods to north korea. that would violate security council sanctions. some of the exports include luxury items and parts that could be used to make missiles. a u.n. panel of experts recently compiled a report on how the sanctions against north korea are working. they noted some in the north are importing pianos from japan and plan to buy yachts from europe. they also cited cases in which items that could be converted for use in ballistic missiles have made it into the reclusive nation. the report promises to investigate allegations that transport and launch vehicle for what appeared to be an intercontinental ballistic missile was purchased from china. members of the military displayed the hardware last month in a parade in pyongyang. this report points to cases of forged documents and other illegal practices in the port city of dalian, where elicit trade deals are often arranged. it urged u.n. member states to be more thorough with freight inspections. >>> the united nations an
good support of. at a political level, we're very happy to see the outcome of the u.s.-china strategic and economic dialogue in may of this year, where paragraph 47 said that china and the united states would work together to combat illegal trade in wildlife and they'll have a meeting in june following up on the implementation of that paragraph. society has no financial mechanism, the global environment facility does not serve as a financial mechanism to the convention, where it does serve as a mechanism to the convention, this is a historic anomaly that we also believe we have an opportunity to correct, to let parties decide the financial mechanism to tackle this major problem. the 40th anniversary of our convention will be in march this year, the convention is in both cites and in other parts of the world, the washington convention. this coincides of the 16th convention of the parties and that provides us a wonderful opportunity to take stock of the current situation, to put in place new initiatives, to state clear and concise messages regarding not tolerating this crime and to open
shoal in the south china sea. the territory is claimed by both china and the philippines. the demonstrations come one month after china deployed vessels in the area. nhk world's kathleen ocampo reports from manila. >> china! >> back off! >> reporter: nearly 150 demonstrators gathered outside the chinese embassy in manila, voicing their criticism of recent actions by the chinese government. >> to take away something without even taking consideration your neighbors, i guess that is not a proper way. >> reporter: the latest role began april 10th when chinese marine survey ships prevented a philippine navy vessel from seizing chinese fishing boats near the shoal. as the standoff continued china instructed authorities on may 2nd to step up checks on bananas and other food grown in the philippines. there's speculation the move is effectively a countermeasure on china's part. china accuses the philippine government of being behind the backlash on friday. >> translator: it was inappropriate for the philippines to incite its people to hold the rally. this will only complicate and
called china's most wanted fugitive has been given life in prison for running a multimillion-dollar smuggling operation. ♪ it's so good >> and tribute to the queen of disco. donna summer dies 863. >> drive -- donna summer dies at age 63. >> live from singapore. >> and from london. >> hello and welcome been trading is expecting to be serious when facebook shares go on sale in new york leaater. no one yet knows whether facebook can actually generate a profit. >> it started as the facebook in 2004 as the brainchild of a harvard law student named mark zuckerber. it now has 900 million active users. they upload 3 million photos every day. but here is the most extraordinary figure. $104 billion -- the value now put on facebook. >> we are all here because of the people using facebook. >> this video has been shown to potential investors for the last fortnight. the price has been raised. >> it was almost proven entirely by facebook. >> this man runs the world's biggest advertising business. but facebook will now be valued at six times the price the margin sold wpc. >> there are a lo
with the help of old friends's in 1999, i escaped to the country that -- i escaped china, that destroyed me, and came tolt free soil of america. my husband came to the u.s. a year later. we were able to mend our past grievance and divorced in 2001. i became ex-claimly depressed after the divorce but as for suggestions of my friends i started attending church where i felt the warmth of christ's family and then lord jesus led me to give up the bitterness in my heart bit by bit. i reunited with my husband in 2009 and we joined together again after i was baptized last year. now two years ago. now we live in a great family of christ, and the free land of america. i feel happiness, but know that back in china there are millions of women who are suffering like i did every day. thousands of young lives are being destroyed. i beg everyone to save them and wish everyone would join me in prayer for them. may the love of our heavenly father, the grace of jesus christ and the holy spirit fill their hearts and release them from the hellish suffering, in the name of our lord jesus chris
heart of the courage these people have. people who live in china to come to the united states and testify are risking not only their own safety but that of their families to expose the truth of what is going on there. not simply so that we will know what is happening, but so we will take effective action to try to help free the people of china from these horrific human rights abuses. several days later, john chung yung did return to china. feared materialized the. he was beaten, dragged away by four cadres and right in front of his daughter who was screaming and his wife was beaten, and so then i got a call from congressman smith and immediately flew back to washington to speak at a press conference for him to be released. despite this violence, john chung yung has persisted in bravely. in february, 2011, he and his wife released through the china aid association a video showing the horrific conditions of their house arrest. and for that they were severely beaten and left without medical attention. and then soon after that a group of chen's lawyers got together to try to talk
:00 what did you learn? -- what time is it, willy? >>> the china syndrome, the diplomatic dance is about to get more political. this morning the latest twist. and how china has fast become the favorite boogieman for both political parties here in the united states. mitt romney running mate tryout rolls on today with virginia's governor. we will talk with another governor on a short list, louisiana's bobby jindal. it's neck and neck in ohio and florida while the president maintains solid double digit leads. can romney avoid the gore/kerry map track. it's thursday, may 3rd, 2012. overseas an explosive story turning into a diplomatic nightmare. the chinese dissident had eagerly embraced the plan to stay in chinese with his family will tell any reporter he is anxious to get out. he began giving a series of interviews from his hospital bed to anyone who would listen saying his wife and two children have been threatened with violence if he leaves the country. told ian williams i want to leave as soon as possible. i feel very unsafe. my rights and safety cannot be assured here. he said my hope
a diplomat and former member of china's intelligence services of running a business while on assignment in the japanese capital. they say he illegally obtained an alien registration card to do that. an international treaty bans diplomats from carrying out private work. police are preparing to charge the 45-year-old man. the suspect was the first secretary at the chinese embassy in japan. investigators say he applied for a foreign residence card in 2008 at a tokyo ward office, and that he didn't disclose his status as a diplomat. police asked him earlier this month to come in for questioning but he rejected the request and returned to china. investigators say the diplomat may have collected hundreds of thousands of dollars from japanese companies for what he described as investment in the farming business in china. some of the money was reportedly transferred to a bank account he opened with the illegally obtained alien registration card. he allegedly used the funds to expand his ties to politicians and business leaders. japanese police and other authorities said he worked in the second
to cybersecurity marks a step in a new direction for the two nations. washington has in the past accused china of being the primary source of attacks on u.s. targets. >>> human rights in china are again in the spotlight. the latest incident sentence on activest chen geng cheng. he escape d and is in a hospita. a deal was reached after days of tense negotiations between the u.s. and chinese officials. today, we look at how the two major powers negotiated a diplomatic minefield. >> a blind manscapes house arrest and the crisis meetings begins. m civil rights actishivist chen slipped past his guards april 22nd and sought asylum at the embassy. he was against forced abortions, complained of illegal detention, beatings and persecution of his family. his protests couldn't have come at a worst time for chinese authorities, just days before high level talks. u.s. authorities were equally willing to avoid a confrontation. they need to tackle nuclear programs of north korea and iran. the u.s. said they worked out an agreement with the chinese government. he was in a hospital for treatment. his safety gu
in beijing. he is a self taught legal scholar who challenged abuses under china's one child policy after successfully seeking refuge, after a change of heart and claims his family had been threatened chen now says he wants to come to the us. he manage to place a call to a congressional hearing to convey his desire through a translate for. >> i want to meet with secretary clinton. i hope i can get more help from her. i also want to thank her face-to-face. >> clinton is currently in china, engaging in high-level economic talks between the two nations, but did indirectly address the situation. >> as part of our dialogue the united states raises the importance of human rights and fundamental freedom. >> here to unravel this mystery, is former assistant secretary of state for pubic affairs under president obama, p.j. crowley. thank you so much for your time tonight. >> good evening, eliot. >> help me out here i have been reading these stories as they have been emerging. explain to me -- who is mr. chen and why is the entire world focused on him? is he that important? was
from david lampton. he talks about the u.s. and china. talks are taking place about the future economic and other strategic areas. later, we hear from a professor from new york university. he joins us to talk about bureaucracy. we take up those discussions when we come right back. ♪ >> sunday -- >> i do not regard this as just a biography of lyndon johnson. i want each book to examine the climb a political power. i am saying this is political power. see what a president can do in a moment of great crisis. how he gathers and what does he do to get legislation moving to take command in washington. that is the way of examining power. i said, i want to do this in full. i said, let us examine this. >> robert caro. his multivolume biography of the 36th president. this sunday at 8:00 is on c- span's "q&a." also, sunday may 20. >> between 1971 and 1973, richard nixon recorded nearly 4000 hours of phone calls and meetings. >> always agree on the little things and then hold on the big ones. i have done this so often. i make them all feel good but then do not give him the big one. >> every satur
is happening in places like china and brazil? >> well, it is a great time to talk about this stuff because every indices that we are looking at and everybody else is looking at, the dollar index which is representing the fear facer to, and the strength is at levels we have not seen and only one other time since 2008 in the fall when the world was melting down. it is a great time to talk about this. emer emerging is cast with a brush that is not fair fundamentally, but to me, these are the markets that are as tough as i have navigated ever, and it is because of the fundamentals that look interesting and the emerging is trading at 9.5 times earnings and not this cheap in five years and the technicals bombed out the charts and things as contrarians we like to sniff around at are totally not working. >> so we are essentially throwing the technicals and the fundamentals out here. and i want to bring back grace and rich ross, and you are a technical expert on this, and what are the technicals telling yog about selling in the emerging markets? >> well, clearly n a precarious position. the correct
through these ivory -- there is an escalated crisis in south africa. it is driven by demand in china, the demand exceeds the supply. it creates security threats as well as conservation impacts. much of the creating being led by organized crime which undermines good governments, destabilizes security and causes the illegal i canning of ikills on a massive scale. the solutions are to increase funding for anti-poaching efforts, an environmental governance through programs managed by u.s. fish and wildlife service and the state department including u.s. aid funding. we should explore opportunities to use the resources of homeland security to address this global security threat. because otherwise, if allowed to develop, it could breed something that comes back to hit you. we should use new ways of thinking outside the box, using high-tech solutions and above all, we should work more closely in partnership with china to reduce demand at the highest levels of diplomacy. i want to thank quickly the role the u.s. has played in helping to conserve african elephants. key funding for u.s. agenc
and around the globe. there are strategic talks between the u.s. and china, with the mounting apology with what it calls "americans interfering in their affairs. chen guangcheng has left the diplomatic compound, but conflicting reasons are emerging. our correspondent has the details. >> tempers flaring. this was the hospital this afternoon. chinese security agents desperate to keep one of the country's best known human rights activists hidden from us. at the end of a corridor in a wheelchair, we glimpse him -- chen guangcheng. he was brought here by u.s. diplomats. he negotiated a deal with china, a chance to get medical treatment and be allowed to study freely, his safety guaranteed. the silhouettes of his wife and two children, one held captive by security, united with him under the deal. his wife told him that she was fine. you can see there -- having a check out. the lawyer became an icon of the human rights movement in china after the way he expose the weighs thousands of women were forced to have abortions. he was beaten savagely. now, china seems to have been family as as barga
.s. secretary of state, hillary clinton, is due to give a press conference at the end of her visit to china this week. her trip has been overshadowed by the controversy over the blind legal activist, chen guangcheng, who has now apparently been granted permission by the chinese authorities to apply to study abroad. there have been conflicting reports as to whether mr. chen wanted to leave china ever since his dramatic escape from house arrest last week. we're going to bring you the press conference as soon as she starts speaking. first this report by martin patience in beijing. >> china's police have thrown a ring of security around the hospital. dissent isn't tolerated here, as these people outside the building found out. american officials continue to search for a solution to end this crisis. the deputy u.s. ambassador arrived at the hospital with mobile phones for chen guangcheng, but he wasn't allowed to enter the building. speaking on the phone, the blind activist said he'd been detained. >> let me tell you, i can tell you only one thing. my situation right now is very dangerous. for t
it in a g-zero world. >> i think china is the voldemort of america's geo political fauxes, the word that must not be spoken, china. but the problem is if you have a problem out there right now, the way we are spending our money in concern about the long-term, whether you talk about economic state craft and our policy to try to create something to deal with state capitalism or you talk about the money we're spend on fiber or the pivot towards our allies and hard security with the australians and philippines and the rest. what is that becomes, it to the about al qaeda, it's to the about russia. it's about chinament don't listen what our politicians say, watch what america does. >> we continue with steve coll author of private empire, exxon mobile and american power. >> i was intrigued to discomfort extent of their independent attitude about foreign affairs an global affairs. and i came to understand that their self-conscious about their sovereignty like a lot of large multinationals but maybe more so than the great majority. and in relation to the united states government, whether it
claims. and an example of this would be the growing struggles in the east and south china seas between china and its neighbors. clashes which have sometimes resulted in armed violence and the loss of lives. these clashes arise over contested undersea deposits of oil and natural gas. both east china sea and the south china sea are believed to harbor reserves of oil and natural gas but lie in waters of overlapping claims between china on one hand, japan on the other, in the east china sea, and the south china sea, the philippines, vietnam, malaysia, and indonesia, and in pursuing its claims, china has deployed its navy, has clashed with vessels belonging to the other countries, and this has led to naval violence and clashes at sea, and the loss of lives. i worry that these kinds of clashes at sea will intensify and lead some day to a far more dangerous event in which the initial episode escalates into something far more dangerous, including full-scale war. and because the united states is allied with japan, with the philippines, and with other countries in the region, there's a strong ri
left the u.s. embassy yesterday after the u.s. brokered an agreement with china for his freedom and safety. but today at a chinese hospital chen told reuters i want to leave china as soon as possible. my rights and safety cannot be assistant secretary of state p.j. crowley. a lot going on there. we know that we have two cabinet level secretaries there to talk u.s. strategic china dialogue. in the middle of this i think many would call a human rights crisis. how do you think we've played our hand thus far? >> i think we have stood up for human rights and the secretary of state before arriving in beijing put down a very solid marker that this case, the chen case, was important to the united states. understand a couple of things. this is a broad important relationship between the united states and china, it's always going to be difficult and complex on a good day. then you throw something like this into the mix and it can have the potential for tensions although, up until today, it appeared the united states and china had worked constructively, intensely, to try to resolve this. go
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